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The Importance of Dog Dental Cleaning – 5 Tips for A Healthy Smile!

Cleaning your dog’s teeth is essential to maintaining a healthy smile. There are many factors that can affect the health of dog’s teeth, one example being plaque build-up. So, how can you make sure your dog’s teeth stay as clean as possible? This post will cover 5 tips on how to clean your dog’s teeth at home and what signs you should be looking for if they need professional dental care.

I am sure you will agree with me when I say being a responsible pet owner includes the desire to give your pet the very best. You should want to look after your pets and ensure they remain in peak condition. This will keep them both happy and healthy.

One of the best ways to approach this is to make use of a regular dental care program. Brushing your pets’ teeth not only helps to prevent tooth decay and dental disease. Introducing your pup to dental care at a young age can be helpful in the future, but it’s still possible for older dogs to learn some new tricks!

Tip One: Training Your Dog

Your dog doesn’t need to be a puppy in order for you to start teaching them how to allow their teeth and gums to be cleaned. So, if your dog is of an older age it’s not too late! You will want to show your dog what you are going to do before actually doing anything though. Your goal is to make the experience as pleasant and cozy for them as possible. By creating feelings of positive association with brushing their teeth, they’ll be less likely to freak out when you produce a toothbrush every single day. The more practice they have before any professional work, the easier it’ll be in general.

Tip Two: Cleaning Supplies

Introduce Them to the Toothbrush and Get Them Used to It.

You want your dog to associate a toothbrush with something good, not scary. Therefore, you will want them to experience it for themselves without any pressure so they can get used to this new sensation before moving on. Begin by brushing their front teeth and spray a bit of dog dental spray first. Let them sniff the brush and be near it until they’re comfortable enough that even if you start brushing at some point they won’t freak out and then do just that! Be gentle when introducing dog dental spray into the equation as well. They may not like having liquid squirted onto their mouth.

Special Toothpaste

Dogs have different dental needs than people. Human toothpaste contains ingredients that can be toxic to dogs, so it is important to use dog-specific toothpaste. Your vet or local supermarket should stock a range of specially formulated toothpaste designed to appeal to your pet. While you may think beef, chicken or pilchard make for a disgusting toothpaste flavour, your pet will have his own ideas.

Tip Three: Pawfect Timing

Brush your dog’s teeth when you are both relaxed. First and foremost, finding a time that you two can enjoy together will make the process easier for everyone involved.  You have to be gentle when brushing your dog’s teeth, but you can also use this as an opportunity for some bonding! Gently touch their mouth with the toothbrush so they get used to it before moving on. You will want a 45-degree angle brush in order to reach the gumline without hurting or feeling uncomfortable while being brushed.

Tip Four: Repetition

Brush your pup’s pearly whites by mixing up an oral care routine that has just enough entertainment value for them as we do ourselves. The best time of day is after mealtime or before bedtime – this will help keep your dog’s breath smelling fresh too! Brush at least twice per week (or more!) in order to maintain healthy teeth.

Tip Five: Behaviour Rewards

Dogs usually love chewing things like chew toys which will help keep their teeth cleaner too! You might want to incorporate this into your at-home dental plan. TPR (Thermoplastic Rubber) toys are great for knocking plaque off! There is a range of dental chew toys and tasty, healthy treats to help them keep their teeth clean. Example GREENIES™ dental treats and dental chews for dogs. These products are designed with a chewy and flexible texture that allows teeth to sink in for more effective cleaning.  Another example is dehydrated meaty treats such as BLACKDOG  Pig Ear Strips Dog Treats, these wholesome treats will keep your dog chewing longer, with a delectably chewy texture that’s great for teeth and gums.

The Signs You Need to Visit a Veterinarian

Annual dental cleanings is must for pet parents, but it is not just about teeth. Even if you brush your dog’s teeth at home on a daily basis, bacteria trapped under their gums could cause some serious health problems.

The bad breath (If it is not directly related to something they ate) you’ve been noticing around your dog is actually an indication of a serious dental disease that can even lead to bone and tissue loss. This common problem, which usually goes unnoticed first but then becomes increasingly obvious with time, manifests in the form of halitosis (bad breath), swollen gums or inflammation as seen by redness on teeth – not only are these signs alarming, but they are also preventable with adequate care!

If your dog exhibits any of the following symptoms, it is best to consult a vet:

  • Swollen or bleeding gums
  • Difficulty in chewing and eating
  • Excessive drooling
  • Chewing on one side of the mouth
  • Bumps inside their mouths
  • Loose teeth
  • Weight loss
  • Nasal discharge

Dental health is important for dogs, so it is crucial that you take steps to help them maintain a healthy mouth. By following our 5 easy tips on at-home dental care, your pet will be able to stay in good shape. If you have any questions about how to brush your dog’s teeth, consult with your veterinarian before starting this process at home. However, if you are noticing signs of oral discomfort or illness like difficulty eating or drooling excessively then consult with your vet right away.

One comment

  1. Annie Robertson

    It is so difficult to look inside my girls mouth as she would bite you quick smart. She was a rescue dog and has always hated her mouth being touched. You cant even give her tablets you have to put the tablets in her food.

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